Category Archives: Sewing

Copycat Chic: Anthropologie Striped Heart Tank for less than $5

I was browsing Anthropologie recently and fell in love with this Striped Heart Tank by Sundry:

Copycat Chic: Anthropologie Striped Heart Tank for less than $5 | Five Marigolds

So. cute. But the price tag is not so cute. $70 for a cotton tank? No thanks! But it kept popping up in my Facebook feed, willing me to buy it.

That’s when I decided to try to make it myself, but finding a plain white tank was a lot harder than I expected. I ended up just getting a Faded Glory tank from Wal-Mart on a recent grocery trip.  It was the first white tank I found without a pocket, and at $3.96, the price was right!

I whipped up an 8″ x8″ template in Photoshop:

Copycat Chic: Anthropologie Striped Heart Tank for less than $5 | Five Marigolds

I then loaded the pattern into my Silhouette software. My usual method is to use clear contact paper in my Silhouette to make a template because you can get a giant roll for less than $5. Then I use a Tulip soft fabric paint, making sure to insert cardboard into the shirt first to prevent bleeding to the other side. The best part of this application method is that it’s incredibly inexpensive and long lasting.

This time, however, I happened to have some leftover heat transfer vinyl  from a project last year. I ran my design through the Silhouette, removed the excess vinyl, and ironed it on.

Copycat Chic: Anthropologie Striped Heart Tank for less than $5 | Five Marigolds

Next, I added a bit of contrast stitching along the bottom hemline  to give it a more expensive, custom look.

Copycat Chic: Anthropologie Striped Heart Tank for less than $5 | Five Marigolds

I adore this tank and have gotten so many compliments on it. When Eve first saw it, she insisted on a matching tank (I found two great , inexpensive options here and here). I just shrunk the template slightly ( to about 5.25″ x 5.25″) and applied it using the same method. Again, in retrospect I probably would have gone bigger for this one, as well. For this top, I did more stitching to more closely replicate the inspiration top. Instead of using the sewing machine, I hand stitched the hemlines using flossing thread to get that perfectly imperfect look.  think it’s even cuter in this mini size!

Copycat Chic: Anthropologie Striped Heart Tank for less than $5 | Five Marigolds

I hope you’re a fan of my copycat chic Striped Heart Tank. Thanks for stopping by!

 

 

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Tooth Fairy Pillow Using Upcycled Baby Clothing

Looking for a  way to upcycle those baby clothes you can’t part with? When Dub got his first loose tooth, I decided to use his baby clothes to create a tooth pillow – a tradition my parents started with me. The concept is that the tooth pillow makes it easy for the Tooth Fairy to find baby teeth and deposit money (I’ve heard she hates to loose those first baby teeth!).

To make the pillow, I combined a chambray shirt and a little plaid shirt, with snap button pockets, that Dub wore as a baby. He actually helped me dig through his baby clothes to find just the right combo.

Here he is at just 3 months old sporting one of the shirts.

Tooth Fairy Pillow Using Upcycled Baby Clothing | Five Marigolds

My mom used her fancy sewing machine to embroider some letters and voila! An easy, free tooth pillow that he absolutely loves.Tooth Fairy Pillow Using Upcycled Baby Clothing | Five Marigolds

Do you have any Tooth Fairy traditions?

 

Sleeping Beauty Upcycled Tee Shirt Dress

I’ve had this project stuck in my head for a long time, and when I scheduled a visit to my parents’ house this month I knew it was my opportunity to bring it to life. My mom is a professional quilter and a wonderful seamstress, and I knew I would need her to lead the way.

I’d seen the concept of a t-shirt Disney princess dress on Homemade by Jill, but little EClaire already had a Belle dress up costume and wanted something different. So, enlisting one of her favorite colors, I  decided on a Sleeping Beauty dress and found this one by Crafter Hours.

I thought it would surely be a one day project, and it probably was for these sewing pros, but we managed to stretch it out over three days, working probably a total of 10 hours.

First, we started with two women’s tees and large knit nightgown. We used the Simplicity pattern 5695 for the bodice and sleeves. Since we were upcycling clothing, we were able to use the original seam as the casing for the elastic on the sleeves.

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We used a 10″ circle to draw and then sew two lines to emulate a bodice piece, and then sewed a straight line down the middle.

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We wanted a very full skirt, which is difficult to create using knits, but I like how ours turned out. Our skirt used the full width of the large nightgown, which was approximately 32″ across (double the width of our bodice) and 64″ of full width all the way around.  She sewed a long straight stitch across the top and then gently pulled it all around to ruffle it. Then, we attached the ruffled piece to the bodice and sewed it together with a tight straight stitch.

To create a bustle effect, we measured all the way around the bottom of the skirt and marked 9″ high lines every 8″ around. I sewed two long straight stitch lines at every marked line, secured the top and bottom of those lines with pins, and then begin pulling the strings from the top to scrunch the fabric (I like this tutorial for gathering fabric). Then,  when we had the fabric scrunched to the right length, we put stabilizing fabric underneath and sewed right over the fabric, in between the two stitched lines.  I absolutely love this detail of the dress – it really made the whole thing come together!

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My mother created the white accent pieces using this pattern and by sewing square pieces of white knit into triangles. Both accent pieces were tacked on, as she felt the thickness would be too much for the knit dress to handle long-term.

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I love that she’ll be able to wear this any time she wants to feel like a princess, and it’s cool and comfortable enough for everyday wear. Best of all – she absolutely loves it!

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I’m not sure if I would have the skill to pull this off on my own and have it look as nice as this dress does. Maybe I can enlist my mother to create a Snow White tee, or RapunzelCinderella or Elsa dress down the road? I think I’ll wait for some time to pass before I ask…

 

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DIY Advent Calendar – the beginning

advent calendar

DIY Felt Advent Calendar | Five Marigolds

 

As a kid, I absolutely loved Advent Calendars.  You know, the little paper calendars with the perforated doors.  Sometimes there was a Christmas picture behind the little paper door and sometimes a bible verse.  It didn’t matter, I loved the process of opening on each day.  I wanted to create an Advent Calendar tradition with my own children, but I wanted to create a keepsake – something they would look forward to getting out each year.

So, I went to the interwebs to find something to inspire me – and the pickings were slim. This was in 2008, a pre-Pinterest era, and there just wasn’t a lot out there I loved.  Enter Stitchcraft Creations with her super cute felt calendar.  With her pretty version as my guide, I embarked on “adventures in Advent Calendars.”

More to come!

Activity/quiet book

For Dub’s first Christmas years ago, I decided I wanted to start the tradition of making something homemade for my kids for each Christmas. I ambitiously took on an activity book project to kick off the tradition, knowing I could add pages to it each year.

I drew inspiration from the interwebs and used a few patterns  But mostly, I just winged it.  Ididn’t want it to look perfect, I wanted it to look inviting and fun!

  1. I did a lot of web surfing for inspiration.  I used a few patterns from one of my favorite bloggers, Homemade by Jill.
  2. From there, I narrowed down the pages and activities I wanted tobe in the book and madea list of the supplies I needed.  I was patient with this and used 40% off coupons at Michael’sand JoAnn’s for several weeks to avoid paying full price on the more expensive supplies.  Pre-planning is the most important step to any project, because having allthesupplies on hand means fewer half-finished projects laying around that were never picked back up after the inspiration left!
  3. As a working mom, I made it my goal to complete at least two pages every weekend.  This made the project much more manageable for me to take on.  Looking face-on at a full weekend of sewing probably would have killed my motivation to start!
  4. After all of the pages were complete, I paired pages two-by-two and sewed twosheetstogether back-to-back.
  5. I then punched three grommets into each set of pages, like you would if you were going to add them to a binder.
  6. Finally, I used loose leaf rings to secure them together.  I chose to do it this way so I couldrepair pages or continue to add pages as I had kids.

Materials used:

  • White felt pages from the craft store (around 25 cents each)
  • Additional felt pages in various colors
  • Scrap fabric and notions, like a zipper and ricrac,
  • Assorted buttons I had saved over the years
  • Metal snaps (these are easier for little hands to use vs. the plastic snaps)
  • Chalk Cloth fabric
  • Loose leaf rings
  • Grommets
  • Finger puppets from Ikea for the Noah’s Ark page (pictured below).  These are no longer available through Ikea but they pop up on ebay all the time!

Number Counting Duck Pond Quiet Activity book | Five Marigolds Activity Quiet Book Inspiration Rocket Outer Space | Five Marigoldsbird laces

Activity Quiet Book Inspiration Noah's Ark Finger Puppets | Five Marigolds 69998_PE185334_S3

Activity Quiet Book Inspiration | Five MarigoldsActivity Quiet Book Inspiration with Chalk Cloth | Five Marigolds

Activity Quiet Book Inspiration Art Pages | Five Marigolds road

Activity Quiet Book Barn Animals Finger Puppets | Five Marigolds Activity Quiet Book Inspiration | Five Marigolds

Activity Quiet Book Inspiration | Five MarigoldsActivity Quiet Book Barn Animals Finger Puppets | Five MarigoldsI’m happy to say that 4 years later, this book still gets used by Dub and now Eve, too.  It’s held up and only needed 1 small repair.

In retrospect, I wish I had more carefully documented the sewing process and made patterns for each page. It took me a long time pull this book together and it would have been so much easier if all the patterns had been in one place. I often wonder if I should go back and make the patterns to share for the next person. If you would like to see that in the future, please be sure to tell me in the comments below!